狮城有约 | 十分访谈:疫情下的慈善活动

20/07/20201 播出

防疫措施随着疫情变动,残障人士和他们的看护者不得不随时对照护安排做调整。而慈善组织在这段期间难以举办大型活动,也让筹款面对一定困难。

《十分访谈》请到两位肌肉萎缩患者和新加坡协助残障者自立局的通讯与社区促进部署长和我们聊一聊,冠病疫情为残障人士的生活带来哪些挑战。有意提供协助的公众也可以上网(https://www.mef.sg)查询。

Photo shows Mr William Ngo playing a harmonica.

“因为这个疫情,我现在变成‘坐家’,坐在家里。”

患有肌肉萎缩症的吴伟廉过去都靠上街卖艺维持生计。2019冠状病毒疫情却捣乱了他的生活,让他无法继续以卖艺为生。如今,不断向上的他希望学习运用线上科技,把艺术带上网,开启一条新生路。

56岁的吴伟廉透露,他从小走路或跑步时很容易跌倒,一直觉得双脚有问题,直到17岁那年才被诊断患有肌肉萎缩症。

“我要服兵役前进行了身体检查,才被诊断患上肌肉萎缩症。那时我问医生我会怎么样,医生告诉我,你以后要坐轮椅。”

自力更生:街头吹口琴 用嘴巴作画

从小不爱读书的吴伟廉在小学毕业后便停学,到珠宝工厂学制作珠宝首饰,直到病情恶化才被迫离职。

吴伟廉的脚渐渐失去力气,从依靠拐杖到最终得以轮椅代步。尽管如此,他还是非常积极向上,想着应该如何自力更生。

对手工艺术有着浓厚兴趣的他,最终想到了可以学口琴卖艺。“我坐轮椅过后,一开始是靠在外面卖彩票为生。但是买彩票过后就不流行了,我的生意也不好,之后我就想到可以学口琴卖艺,和用嘴巴作画。”

Photo shows some paintings painted by Mr William Ngo who uses his mouth to hold the brushes.

吴伟廉的画作

吴伟廉透露,他在友人的帮助和指引下,找到了可以教他吹口琴的导师,并在2017年申请执照,在街头卖艺。由于吴伟廉双手无力,因此需要在头上架起支架,支撑口琴,让他不用手也能吹起口琴。

但是,吴伟廉的病情逐渐恶化,加上冠病疫情,让他无法继续在街头卖艺。“我喜欢在外面吹口琴,可以看到很多人,有些人很好,会叫我加油。我们的肌肉如果是100%,我只剩下3%。我的屁股已经完全没有肌肉了,坐久了会痛。现在出去卖艺对我来说,可能性很小。”

Photo shows Mr William Ngo using his mouth to hold a paint brush.

吴伟廉在桌边架起多个支架,方便他用嘴巴提笔作画。

尽管冠病疫情和病情影响了他的生计,吴伟廉仍积极向上,还开玩笑说,“因为这个疫情,我现在变成‘坐家’,坐在家里”。但是,他也因此有更多时间在家作画。只见他把家里的其中一个房间变成画室,桌边架起多个支架,摆放了多种颜料,方便他用嘴巴提笔作画。

目前98%的日常生活都得依靠女佣的吴伟廉无奈表示,由于他的肌肉萎缩日益严重,如果无法请到第二名女佣,他最终只好寄托疗养院。这是渴望自立的他最不想要的结果。

“如果我有能力请另一名女佣,我就可以走前一步。我现在一定要走前一步,不可以退后一步。退后一步就是去疗养院了。”

Photo shows Mr William Ngo using his mobile phone..

吴伟廉自认对科技一窍不通,但还是非常乐意学习。

积极向上:上网卖艺 增加收入来源

疫情期间,线上活动成了新趋势。吴伟廉也希望能上网卖艺,增加收入来源,提升生活素质。因此,他通过新加坡协助残障者自立局(SG Enable,简称新协立)的科技辅助基金(Assistive Technology Fund)和新传媒协立慈善基金(Mediacorp Enable Fund)申请援助,购买一台膝上电脑,方便他学习如何上网。

吴伟廉自认对科技一窍不通,但还是非常乐意学习。他透露,近日有朋友帮他设立Facebook账号,通过这个平台成功为他卖出两幅画,算是一个好的开始。

“我希望可以学习怎么上网,画画和吹口琴给人家看。我很多东西不懂,但是我一定要懂,不懂我不可以生存。”

Source: 8world

Photo shows Keith Tan wearing his boxing gloves in his wheelchair

Not boxed in by disability

He swims and plays bocce. He has tried archery and horseriding. He has even given powerlifting a go. But the sport he loves best is boxing.

On his passion, 17-year-old Keith Tan says: “I have loved combat sports since young, so taking up boxing is natural for me. I find strength when I’m doing it, and it trains my mind to be sharper.”

Indeed, strength may be an important attribute for most teenage boys but for Keith, a second-year student at the Institute of Technical Education (ITE) @ Simei, it is especially significant because he has spastic diplegia cerebral palsy.

A different childhood

He was diagnosed with the neurological condition when he was one.

“As a baby, I wasn’t that active. I wasn’t rolling around or crawling. I would just lie there. My aunt was the one who first noticed it. So, my mother went to the doctor to see if this was cause for concern. The doctor then told my mum that I have cerebral palsy.”

The condition affects muscle control and coordination – it increases muscle tone such that a person’s muscles become stiff, and reflexes are exaggerated. Motor or movement milestones tend to be delayed too. 

For Keith, this means that doing “even the simplest stuff” has been a challenge. He requires help for daily activities like bathing, getting dressed and visiting the toilet, and moves around in a wheelchair. 

“My movements, especially waist down, are restricted. I can’t stand with both hands free. One hand has to be holding on to something for support. Speech is another thing. Sometimes my voice sounds strained because my muscles tense up.”

To help him, Keith always has a domestic helper by his side, even when he goes to school. However, he shares that having an adult supervising his every move has put a dampener on making new friends.

“I can’t be myself because there is always someone there. So, I am more guarded and that has contributed to my introverted nature. But I want to change that as I get older. I want to be more independent.”

Ticked the right boxes

Photo shows Keith in wheelchair having a post-session debrief with his boxing coach after his training.

Keith having a post-session debrief with his boxing coach after his training.

 

In October 2019, Keith decided to take up boxing, a sport that had intrigued him for a long time.

In his search for a school that would take him in, Keith chanced upon the Spartans Boxing Club. He wrote in without much expectation, but was warmly welcomed by the owner and he soon started lessons.

However, as Keith progressed, he realised that his wheelchair was not ideal for the sport, and he needed a sturdier wheelchair that could move around better. This was tough for his single mum who works in F&B, as a new wheelchair could easily cost up to a five-figure sum.

With assistance from the Mediacorp Enable Fund, Keith was able to buy a customised wheelchair that can support him better as he spars and trains. The new wheelchair is also lighter, making it easier for Tan to manoeuvre as he goes about his daily activities.

For the aspiring programmer who intends to further his studies at a polytechnic after he graduates from ITE, boxing seems to be the sport that has ticked all the right boxes for him.

“This is something I can do for the long haul, and I am grateful to be able to receive help from MEF to buy a new wheelchair so that I can continue my passion.”

Venerable Sek Ming Woon, one of two executrices of the late Venerable Suit’s estate, presenting a S$100,000 cheque to CEO of SG Enable, Ms Ku Geok Boon

The late Venerable Suit Woo Foong was a simple man. Born in China in 1921, he became a monk when he was just 12 and lived in monasteries until he passed away at the age of 97 in 2018.

In his final years, Venerable Suit lived in Singapore’s oldest Buddhist monastery, the Lian Shan Shuang Lin Monastery.

Known to be compassionate and generous, he was dedicated throughout his life to the pursuit of the spiritual as well as the alleviation of sufferings of the physical world.

It came, then, as no surprise that he had bequeathed proceeds from the only asset he owned – a house in Telok Kurau – to several charities.

The Mediacorp Enable Fund (MEF) was one of these charities. It received S$100,000 in support of its work to build a society where persons with disabilities are recognised for their abilities and are enabled to lead full, socially integrated lives.

The donation from the estate of the late Venerable Suit will go towards funding three broad areas: Aspirations and Last Mile Needs, Transition to Work, and Community Support.

In the area of Aspirations and Last Mile Needs, individuals will be supported in skills development or with financial assistance, while organisations will be aided in the development of their talents. The Transition to Work scope provides customised training and employment programmes to smoothen transition at critical stages of life. Community Support is a three-pronged effort that supports initiatives to enhance the independence and integration of people with disabilities, offers support to caregivers, and fosters a network of Special Education (SPED) alumni so that they do not become isolated.

Said Ms Ku Geok Boon, CEO of SG Enable which administers MEF: “We are grateful for this kind donation from the estate of the late Venerable Suit Woo Foong. It is most timely as the impact of COVID-19 on persons with disabilities and their caregivers is showing to be disproportionately huge compared to other vulnerable groups. (Venerable Suit’s) generosity will enable MEF to continue extending help and relief to persons with disabilities, and encourage them to keep their faith and stay positive, knowing that the community cares for them during these difficult times.”

Photo shows Alumni Neo Kah Whye on his way home in a hydraulic van after participating in the Hydro Weekly programme at CPAS.Alumni Neo Kah Whye on his way home in a hydraulic van after participating in the Hydro Weekly programme at CPAS.

 

New support for SPED schools for continued engagement with alumni

Once a person with disability graduates from a Special Education (SPED) school, he / she may be transitioned into the workforce through programmes like the School-to-Work Transition Programme that enhances the independence and integration of the graduate.  

However, such programmes currently do not include activities that help these graduates maintain the ties that they have built in school, as such bonding activities require extra resources that SPED schools do not have.

A need to support SPED school alumni networks

This is where the Mediacorp Enable Fund (MEF) comes in. MEF aims to build a society where persons with disabilities are recognised for their abilities and are enabled to lead full, socially integrated lives. SG Enable, an agency dedicated to enabling persons with disabilities, is MEF’s administrator while Mediacorp is its official media partner.

In supporting SPED schools and their networks, the community-based fund has since expanded its aid to include support for the caregivers of persons with disabilities, as well as for programmes that look to foster a network of SPED alumni so they do not become isolated.

Specifically, the MEF will support SPED schools or their parent organisations under its SPED Alumni Engagement funding for outreach programmes that encourages continued engagement by the community with their alumni networks. 

On this, Ms Selina Heng, Manager of SG Enable said: “The relationships that these graduates have established in school are crucial to their overall development and it is important for them to continue to have a strong support network.”

SPED Alumni Engagement Support’s first recipient

In January 2021, MEF’s Community Fund supported Cerebral Palsy Alliance Singapore (CPAS) with S$20,000 under its SPED Alumni Engagement funding. This will go to defraying their cost of running their Beyond Boundaries Club’s weekly programmes, which include riding lessons, hydrotherapy, creative arts and music, digital art and flower design.

Ms Yurnita Bte Omar, Alumni Liaison Executive of Adult Services at CPAS said: “We are thankful to be the first recipient of MEF’s SPED Alumni Engagement funding. This will assist with the cost of running our weeklactivities, through which we hope to bridge the gap between our alumni and the community. With the funding, we also hope to reach out to more high support and home-bound alumni.”

Some 35 CPAS alumni, aged between 18 and 55, with moderate to severe physical or multiple disabilities will benefit from the funding this year.

How SPED schools can qualify for funding

SPED schools (or their parent organisations) hoping to get support for their alumni engagement initiatives can apply for the funding under two categories:

  • Ad-hoc events such as social recreational activities for alumni and families; and / or
  • Regular or structured programmes including learning and development programmes and self-improvement courses for alumni.

 

Applications that do not fall into these categories will be assessed on a case–by-case basis.

Schools can submit a proposal through their principal any time during the year but can only receive funding once every 12 months. Their proposal, complete with an application form, should map out key details such as when the activity will take place, its nature and objectives, the target number of participants as well as the budget.

Once funding has been given and the event or programme completed, a brief report of the entire proceeding needs to be submitted. Regular activities will require reports either on a quarterly, half-yearly or annual basis.

SINGAPORE: The Mediacorp Enable Fund is launching the Sustained CARE giving drive to support people with disabilities and their caregivers, who face a “disproportionately severe” impact from the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Caregivers have been under added pressure to provide for their loved ones due to adjustments that have to be made in access to rehabilitation and care services,” said the company in a media advisory on Monday (May 24).

Many people with disabilities also continue to face challenges engaging in day-to-day activities, while also being affected by job losses and slower hiring, said Mediacorp.

Contributions to the Sustained CARE giving drive can be pledged online from now until Jul 30.

Donations will be used to meet the commuting and mobility needs of people with disabilities, nurture their talents, support their education and employment needs, and give respite and support to their caregivers.

“It has been a long fight against COVID-19 for everyone, and persons with disabilities and their families continue to face greater difficulties adapting to the challenges brought about by the pandemic,” said Mediacorp CEO Tham Loke Kheng.

“We are committed to working with SG Enable to leverage the reach of our multiple platforms and influence of our talents to do our part to help this vulnerable community.

“We are also very grateful for the incredible support from donors during last year’s campaign and we hope that those who are able to will continue to give wholeheartedly and generously again this year,” said Ms Tham.

The Sustained CARE giving drive follows a previous initiative launched by the Mediacorp Enable Fund in May last year to respond quickly to the immediate needs of people with disabilities during Singapore’s “circuit breaker” period.

That initiative raised S$577,000 in just over two months, supporting 2,000 beneficiaries.

SG Enable CEO Ku Geok Boon said: “The generous donations from corporates and the public have gone a long way in providing urgent and direct support to persons with disabilities and their caregivers, particularly during the circuit breaker.

“We are thankful for the public’s generosity and Mediacorp’s continued support with this second fundraising campaign to meet the beneficiaries’ needs as they adjust to the new normal.”

The Mediacorp Enable Fund is a community fund administered by SG Enable. It aims to help build a society where people with disabilities are recognised for their abilities and lead full, socially integrated lives.

SG Enable supports the fund’s administrative functions and Mediacorp is the official media partner.

Source: CNA/dv

 

SINGAPORE: A new foundation established by Singapore-based fintech firm Aleta Planet has donated S$100,000 to the Mediacorp Enable Fund, the company said on Friday (Oct 16) in a media release.

Aleta Planet announced on Friday that the foundation will make donations to various charities, aiming to “create a positive impact on society at a time when the COVID-19 pandemic has adversely affected many livelihoods”.

It will support the needs of the elderly and children in the local community, with an initial commitment of S$200,000, said the company.

The first of such donations is S$100,000 to the Mediacorp Enable Fund, a community fund administered by SG Enable that aims to help build a society where people with disabilities, including the elderly and children, “are recognised for their abilities and are able to lead full, socially integrated lives”.

SG Enable chief executive officer Ku Geok Boon said: “We are deeply grateful to Aleta Planet Foundation for their strong spirit of charity and choosing the Mediacorp Enable Fund to make their first donation. 

“The generous contribution will provide much-needed financial assistance in meeting the last mile needs of persons with disabilities, as well as to help them fulfil their aspirations in life.”

This will enable the foundation to connect with suitable charity partners as well as manage the funds it receives.

CEO of the Community Foundation of Singapore Catherine Loh said: “We look forward to closer collaboration with the Aleta Planet Foundation to identify gaps in the community so as to foster more effective giving and amplify the positive impact they have on our society.”

Aleta Planet Foundation said its support for the elderly “will go particularly towards those abandoned by their families and those having to work despite their frailties”. 

It will also focus on children with disabilities and those from low-income families whose parents “have little means to help them reach their full potential”.

Aleta Planet chairman and group CEO Ryan Gwee said that contributions to the foundation will increase over time “as part of a sustainable corporate giving culture”.

“As Aleta Planet has reached a level of growth, we feel that it is now fitting for us to give back to the community in which we operate,” said Mr Gwee.

“This is especially timely amid a pandemic and recession that have created considerable hardship for the most vulnerable groups living on the fringes of our society.

 

Mediacorp said the impact of the Covid-19 outbreak on people with disabilities and their caregivers has been “disproportionately huge”.

From cooked meals and cash relief to the provision of essentials, a new initiative by the Mediacorp Enable Fund — a charity fund by national media network Mediacorp and SG Enable — aims to help people with disabilities and their caregivers ride out the Covid-19 pandemic.

The initiative “C.A.R.E.” — short for the provision of cooked meals, assistance funds, respite care and essentials — will be driven by public donations, Mediacorp said in a statement on Thursday (May 14) as it launched the scheme.

The funds collected from the campaign will give beneficiaries access to:

Cooked meals. These will be for persons with physical disabilities or those with visual impairment who are living alone, frail persons with disabilities and aged caregivers

A one-off cash relief of S$400 for families with multiple persons with disabilities who face financial hardship and caregiving stress. This will help the families defray the costs of daily expenses and other needs, such as medical costs

Respite care — home-based respite that provides relief for caregivers. This will minimise the risks of burnout and injury for low-income elderly carers who look after persons with disabilities round-the-clock

Fortnightly distribution of dry food rations. This will help persons with physical disabilities or those with visual impairment who are living alone, frail persons with disabilities and elderly caregivers

Mediacorp said the impact of the Covid-19 outbreak on people with disabilities and their caregivers has been “disproportionately huge”.

Those among this group who are seeking employment or are working have been hit hard, with some having lost their jobs, the company noted.

“Many have not been able to access rehabilitation and care services when non-essential services are suspended, while others face greater difficulty getting food and necessities due to mobility challenges,” Mediacorp said.

Singapore is in the midst of an eight-week circuit breaker to curb the spread of Covid-19, with rules to limit business activity and restrict movement for all but essential activities.

To drive the initiative, the Mediacorp Enable Fund — a community fund administered by SG Enable, an agency supporting people with disabilities — has started a fundraising campaign on the Giving.sg website. It has set a target to raise S$500,000 by the end of June. 

Six Mediacorp personalities will chip in to the fundraising drive by rallying support and appealing for donations on Mediacorp platforms and social media.

They are presenters Glenda Chong (regional news network CNA), Fadli Kamsani (Warna 94.2FM), Lin Peifen (Yes 933), Chris Mak (987FM), Mohamed Rafi (Oli 96.8FM), as well as artiste Denise Camillia Tan from The Celebrity Agency.

Mediacorp chief executive officer Tham Loke Kheng said that nobody is spared the impact of the pandemic, in particular persons with disabilities and their caregivers.

“Mediacorp is committed to working with SG Enable to do our part to help this vulnerable group by leveraging our media network as well as the reach and influence of our artistes… to spread awareness of the C.A.R.E. donation drive,” she said.

“We hope that members of the public who are able to help can support wholeheartedly and generously.”
Read more at https://www.todayonline.com/singapore/mediacorp-launches-scheme-support-persons-disabilities-their-caregivers-during-covid-19

Last Mile Help Hits Home

Heng Lye Nging has not had it easy. Her only child, Lina, was born with developmental delay, autism and hearing impairment, something she only confirmed when her child was three years old. Lina is now 24.

“I suspected something was wrong because she wasn’t behaving like other children. She started babbling at eight months but stopped soon after. She never learnt to walk. She didn’t play with other children,” recalled Madam Heng.

It took several visits to various hospitals before Lina’s disabilities were diagnosed. Madam Heng’s in-laws could not accept the girl’s condition and her marriage broke down soon after.

Although she was entitled to both alimony and child support after the divorce, Madam Heng never demanded either.

“If my ex-husband has money, he will give me some. If not, I don’t ask,” she said. “I only ask that he takes Lina out every weekend to spend time with her. That was my only condition.”

Lasting Devotion

Left to support Lina on her own, Madam Heng began to work at coffee shops as a stall assistant, often clocking in 12- to 15-hour shifts.

“We try to make ends meet. Lina’s not picky. When I don’t have enough money, I feed her canned sardines and she is just as happy,” smiled Madam Heng.

“On her birthday, she gets to eat KFC or McDonald’s. She likes that and I buy her a little cake to celebrate. We do this only once a year. That’s all we can afford.”

Although Madam Heng did not make much, she made sure her daughter was well cared for. She hired a maid to watch over Lina when she went to work and trained the maid to care for her special needs child who, by her own admission, is not easy to manage.

“She throws temper tantrums when she can’t get her way and won’t take no for an answer. She hits people as well. The older she gets, the worse the tantrums have become. She also gets restless and refuses to sleep at night, choosing to pace the room or raid the refrigerator for food.”  

As a result, they have not been able to retain their maids for long. The constant change of maids has been difficult on Lina as well.

“She will chase the new maid out of her room, refuse to eat or become violent. At times, she will vent her frustration by throwing things out of her bedroom window. I had to put a net across the window because she refused to stop,” confided Madam Heng.

Still, she says Lina can be thoughtful.

“She may not be able to dress herself, bathe herself or go to the bathroom on her own, but she knows when she is loved and she can be sensitive to my needs,” Madam Heng said.

“When I come home from work exhausted or when I am sad, she can sense it and she will give me a hug. She won’t ask me for things like she usually does.”  

Mother and daughter are so close they need neither words nor sign language to communicate.

“I can sense what she wants. It’s a mother’s instinct. Sometimes, just a look is enough for me to understand her.”

Last Mile Help

Then a year ago, Madam Heng sustained a fall. She hurt her leg so badly she could not work. Without a regular income, she could not contribute to her Central Provident Fund (CPF). Without money in her CPF, she soon fell behind on the payment for her Housing Development Board (HDB) flat. She resorted to small loans from friends but it was still not enough. She faced the real risk of losing her home.

Through St Andrew’s Autism Centre’s Day Activity Centre (DAC) where Lina has been attending since 2012, Mediacorp Enable Fund (MEF) found out about Madam Heng’s plight. Aid from MEF helped Madam Heng tide through a very difficult period by financing Lina’s DAC fees, meals and transport for a one-year period.
 
“I am so grateful to MEF for their help. I don’t usually like to rely on others. I try not to ask my family to help us because Lina is my responsibility. I don’t expect others to take care of her,” said Madam Heng.

Lasting Care

Asked about her hopes for Lina, Madam Heng is sober, “I live one day at a time. I don’t ask for much, just that she grows up peacefully. I don’t expect her ever to be able to work or take care of herself independently.”

10 years ago, Madam Heng made plans for the day when she is no longer around to care for her only child.

“I told my niece to sell my flat and use the money to pay for Lina to stay at a home,” said Madam Heng. “Until then, I will care for her the best that I can.”

These days, things are looking up a little. Madam Heng’s friend recommended her to a coffee shop and she is working once more.

“Lina is not be able to tell you what she wants or when she is not comfortable. All she will do is cry. As a mother, it is my job to figure out how to make her feel better. But when she is happy, she will give me a kiss.”

An independent spirit who fiercely protects and loves her child, Madam Heng may not often ask for help, but she is always thankful when people come alongside her to ensure that her daughter is continually being trained and engaged. The rest, like the glimpses of affection Lina is able to show, is a bonus.

Arising from the family’s dire financial situation, Lina’s DAC programme fee had been deviated to $100 monthly for several years. Since January 2017, the fee has been paid by a private donor as Mdm Heng is unable to manage the cost of programme fee and bus transport. Further assistance has been extended for the programme fee till March 2019. Other short-term assistance was also arranged to defray the family’s daily living expenses. The family’s financial situation has not improved. Mdm Heng foresees she will have difficulty with managing the cost of DAC and transport after March 2019.

In addition, Mdm Heng has no savings and exhausted her CPF.

In Feb 2019, MEF granted $3,000 as a last mile need, to help meet Ms Lina’s DAC programme fee and meal expense, as well as the balance bus transport cost, all amounting to $257.50 per month so as to alleviate the financial strain on the family.

ABLE To Help

ABLE began with a vision that the physically challenged should not be left behind in society. That singular idea led to the founding of Abilities Beyond Limitations and Expectations (ABLE) in 2009 which sits under Caritas Singapore, the official social and community arm of the Catholic Church in Singapore.

A decade in, ABLE has empowered many with physical disabilities to live dignified, productive and independent lives through their signature Return-to-Work (RTW) programme.

“We customise our Return-To-Work programme based on the needs of each client, who may have acquired a disability resulting from conditions such as a stroke or traumatic brain injury,” said ABLE’s Rehabilitation Programme Manager, Carmen Lok.

Partners in Enabling

Always looking to support efforts that enable those with disabilities, it was natural for Mediacorp Enable Fund (MEF) to support ABLE’s initiatives through a partnership with SG Enable. MEF supports some of ABLE’s employment support services, allowing the charity to help people with acquired disabilities return to work.

“The partnership is very important to us especially in our efforts to help those with disabilities who come from low-income backgrounds,” said Ms Lok.

Rebuild Lives

ABLE’s work may be targeted specifically at persons with disabilities, but for those it helps, ABLE is central to their sense of worth and well-being. Manfred Seah, 59, would certainly testify to this. Eight years ago, Mr Seah’s world fell apart because of a single, though deadly, bout of fever.

“I was on a business to trip to the US when I suddenly came down with a fever. I carried on with my activities as usual but after I returned to Singapore five days later, I had to be sent to the ICU. I was in a coma for one and a half months due to a viral infection,” recalled Mr Seah.

The virus attacked Mr Seah’s spinal cord and brain. By the time he woke up, Mr Seah could no longer walk and his left eye was affected. For a year, he was bed-ridden and had to undergo physiotherapy at home.

“After a while, I realised I couldn’t carry on like that. So, St Andrew’s Community Hospital, where I was undergoing physiotherapy, linked me up with ABLE in 2017.”

ABLE became integral to Mr Seah’s efforts to return to the workforce.

Re-train to Return to Work

Mr Seah entered ABLE’s multi-disciplinary Rehabilitation and Training programme that includes rehabilitation, employment support, training and social work services. He started off with physiotherapy to improve his activities of daily living and increase his community mobility. Through employment support sessions, he explored potential job sectors, discovered what he wanted in his career and identified his training needs to achieve his career goal.

“I used to be the head of my company’s IT department, so I wanted to go back into something IT-related,” said Mr Seah.

ABLE’s Employment Support Specialist provided vocational counselling and helped him match his skills to available jobs and re-design his skill sets to increase his employability. When he was ready to go on a job hunt, ABLE was on hand to assist Mr Seah in the creation of a new resume and to approach employers.  

“We have been fortunate enough to work with many inclusive employers willing to employ those with disabilities and give them a new lease of life. A common misconception employers have is that they would need to invest a huge amount of resources into accommodating employees with disabilities. However, this is often not the case. For example, it may be as simple as customizing the employee’s job tasks based on their strengths and abilities,” said Ms Lok.

Persons with disabilities face a variety of challenges when they seek employment. For example, some companies do not have group insurance that can cover the new hires with disabilities because of their pre-existing medical conditions. Others, like one employer who initially wanted to hire Mr Seah, do not have wheelchair-friendly offices.

“They wanted to hire me to teach English to their employees but their office didn’t have an elevator,” said Mr Seah.

In May 2018, a year after getting assistance from ABLE, he managed to secure a job as an IT system Advisor in an SME.  

Continue to Support

ABLE’s support does not end when its clients become employed.

“We offer post-employment support to help them transition back into the workforce,” said Ms Lok.

ABLE’s Employment Support Specialist visited Mr Seah’s workplace to better understand his work environment and provide accommodations advisory to Mr Seah’s employer if needed.

“This is so the newly employed can excel at their jobs,” said Ms Lok.

Life may not always be fair, but everyone deserves a fair chance. That is why ABLE strives to give everyone a success story like Mr Seah’s.

Supporters

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Gift from one, hope for many

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